3 Answers

1vote

Hmmm. You arrive at a destination when you reach it. Let me think about the difference.

Timetables for buses, trains etc use "arrive" and "depart". These are the more formal words. For example, "The train now departing at Platform 1 is for Aberdeen and is due to arrive at 23.00."

In conversation, we say "arrive, "get to" or "reach" interchangeably. We'd say "leave" or "go" rather than "depart". For instance, "I leave home at 07.30 in the mornings and get to work at about 08.45." "We'll leave here at about 10.30 and hope to reach Cornwall by lunchtime" "If you go now, you should arrive before twelve"

2votes

bluebird 1670

Arrive is a travel term ... to arrive at the chosen destination. Therefore if travelling up a mountain, one could definitely say we have arrived at the peak.

Arrive can also be used in a non physical sense "as if for instance: travelling to a conclusion" e.g. I have arrived at a conclusion.

Reach has the meaning of ... the extention of something to gain hold or understanding.

Reach is also a term often used to mean "achieved" so again we could say ... I have reached the top of the mountain.

0vote

I can explain this using an example. I'm expecting my friend at the DC airport coming from New York. Since DC airport is the destination therefore when I see the board it says the flight will ARRIVE in 20 minutes. Now consider a friend of mine is waiting for me at the New York airport and I'm at the DC airport and am about to leave. My friend asks my status. I'll respond as "I'll REACH the New York airport in 45 minutes". Hope this is informative and clarifies the difference.

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